Articles | Volume 73, issue 1
https://doi.org/10.5194/egqsj-73-23-2024
https://doi.org/10.5194/egqsj-73-23-2024
Research article
 | 
18 Jan 2024
Research article |  | 18 Jan 2024

Diverse phenotypes of Late Glacial–Early Holocene downy birch (Betula pubescens Erh.) and the morphology of early Preboreal tree stands in southern Schleswig-Holstein

Sascha Krüger

Viewed

Total article views: 483 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
403 67 13 483 27 12 9
  • HTML: 403
  • PDF: 67
  • XML: 13
  • Total: 483
  • Supplement: 27
  • BibTeX: 12
  • EndNote: 9
Views and downloads (calculated since 18 Jan 2024)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 18 Jan 2024)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 467 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 467 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 17 Jun 2024
Download
Short summary
In reconstructing the living conditions of the late ice age and the early warm periods, archaeologists rely on palaeobotany. Since the 1940s, there has been the common image of a treeless tundra, which changes to a light birch forest within only a few years at the transition between the periods. By using environmental data, it is demonstrated that this image must be refined, and examples are given for a better understanding of palaeobotanical data and their use in archaeological reconstructions.